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Jack Ross' Diary - Time For A Change Of Season

By Graham Forrest
Wed, 10th Apr 2002 12:00am

In his diary this week Clyde captain Jack Ross hints that he would be happy to see the Old Firm leave Scottish football, advocates a move to summer football could be benefitial and also suggestss Clyde fans can look forward to some good performances from now until the end of the season.

When I first returned to full time football around two years ago, I still fulfilled the occasional family business commitment. In such meetings, I often commented (light-heartedly of course) that my mind was stagnating due to dressing room discussions revolving mainly around what was on television the previous night. At that point I was blissfully unaware of how significant a role the television would come to play in present day football.

Yes, it seems that the big audio and visual box coupled with its satellite dish sidekick could drive some football clubs to extinction. However, as with most things, there is always a positive that can be derived from even the most severe of negative events. In this instance, can the current plight faced by football not be countered by a revolutionary rethink of our approach to the sport?

Bleak winter

To my mind it would be as good a time as any to have the courage to implement ideas that have been eternally considered, but never utilised. Much publicity has surrounded the Old Firm position in the debate, and it seems there is growing support for them to be excluded from future Scottish league progress. Personally, I am no great lover of either member of the big two and yet would prefer not to dwell on their actions as they undoubtedly receive overpowering coverage as it is.

One idea that, given our depressingly poor climate, has surprisingly yet to be put into action is that of summer football. Firstly, from a playing perspective it is far more enjoyable to participate in games where the sun shines, the wind does not blow and pitches are flat and plentiful in grass. Secondly, supporting a side takes admirable commitment and yet is it not less of a chore when at least the weather is kind to you?

I would guess that those who watch a lot of football on television, and I am one of them, do so more throughout the bleak winter months. When the fair weather begins, do football lovers not prefer to venture out in search of a local senior, junior or amateur game in preference to a run-of-the-mill televised clash? I would suggest that they do.

Furthermore, if clubs are serious about encouraging more children, women and families to support their team, then summer football once again provides a greater incentive for them to attend in greater numbers.

Finally, I am pleased to report that the sun is shining on Clyde, as at long last the few remaining relegation clouds have been blown away. They have been dispersed by a five-game unbeaten run, which should ensure that we can relax, and play as well as possible in our final fixtures. Such displays could mean a happy summer for our fans, even if it is football free for now.